EMERALD CITY

RESIDENCE, COMMERCIAL, COMPLEX


Site :PhuDien, Hanoi, Vietnam
Site Area : 8,69 ha
Building Area : 472648m²
Total Area : 3.864.994m²

BCI AWARDS

2012 - 2017 BCI TOP10/
TOP 10 BCI CHAU A

We've got BCI award 2 time in 2012 and 2017
BCI Asia Awards (BCIAA) - Top 10 Architect Awards
honors the most commercially significant architects
in HK, MLS, PLP, SGP, TLD and Vietnam

U-Silk City

RESIDENCE, COMMERCIAL, COMPLEX
Site : Van Khe, Hanoi, Vietnam
Site Area : 92,107m²
Building Area : 26,793m²
Total Area : 681,821m²

Celve Complex

SPORTS, COMMERCIAL COMPLEX
Site : Van Phu, Ha Ðong, Hanoi, Vietnam
Site Area : 65,606m²
Building Area : 30,383m²
Total Area : 772,347m²

D27e SEVEN STARS

OFFICE, APARTMENT COMPLEX
Site : CauGiay, Hanoi, Vietnam
Site Area : 22,256m²
Building Area : 6,524m²
Total Area : 162,806m²

DRAGON–PIA RESORT

CONDO, ENTERTAIMENT, MARINA
Site :Nha Trang, An Vien, Viet nam
Site Area : 21,974m²
Building Area : 8,081m²
Total Area : 103,923m²

CAU GIE-NINH BINH EXPRESS
SERVICE AREA

SERVICE AREA, COMPLEX MALL
Site : Ha Nam, Viet nam
Site Area :18,562m²
Building Area : 6,012m²

E4-19 COMPLEX

APARTENT COMMERCIAL COMPLEX
Site : Cau Giay, Ha noi, Viet nam
Site Area : 4,450m²
Building Area : 2,059m²
Total Area : 51,609m²

YAOUNDÉ HOTEL

HOTEL, SERVICE APARTENT, CONFERENCE
Site : Yaounde, Cameroon
Site Area : 6ha
Building Area : 3,059m²

recent


Our News

2019/04/23

AIA and ACSA Announce the Winners of the 2018/2019 COTE Top 10 for Students Awards

Today, The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) announced the winners of the fifth-annual AIA COTE Top 10 for Students awards. The design and ideas competition—which is open to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students at ASCA-member schools in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico—awards work completed in the course of study (either in a design studio or a related class) from January 2018 to the present. Projects were evaluated using the same 10 measures that are featured in the professional COTE Top Ten Awards, which are: integration, community, ecology, water, economy, energy, wellness, resources, change, and discovery.
Each winning project will receive a $500 a stipend to attend the AIA Conference on Architecture in Las Vegas this June, where the winning projects will be on display. Each winning student will also be offered a paid summer internship at a firm that specialize in sustainable design.
This year's jury was made up of Mary Demro of Montana State University; David Dowell, AIA, of El Dorado; Bradford Grant of Howard University; and Matthew Noblett, AIA, of Behnisch Architekten/Partners.

The 2018/2019 ACSA/AIA COTE Top 10 for Students Winners


Philip Riazzi; Cameron Foster
Acclimate
Students: Philip Riazzi and Cameron Foster
School: Clemson University
Professors: Ulrike Heine, David Franco, and Daniel Harding
Jury statement: "The Acclimate project establishes an urban identity strategy that successfully deals with metropolitan density. The repurposing of this parking garage demonstrates the value of reuse and finds a new solution for cultivating quality urban life. The slender towers are programmatically designed to enhance views and daylight in an elegant way, creating a vision for how sustainable architecture might appear in the future."



Cole Robinson and Michael Horan
Transfusion: Tapering Tucson
Students: Cole Robinson and Michael Horan
School: Clemson University
Professors: Ulrike Heine, David Franco, and Daniel Harding
Jury statement: "Transfusion innovatively tests new ideas around multi-occupant buildings and their adaptability. The ideas presented in this project take a holistic design approach, integrating energy generated sustainable strategies alongside community focused initiatives."



Sean Anderson; Tobias Jimenez; and Haley Landenburg
Wallingford W2E
Students: Sean Anderson, Tobias Jimenez, and Haley Landenburg
School: Washington State University
Professors: Omar Al-Hassawi
Jury statement: "The Wallingford W2E project does a terrific job of imagining architecture as infrastructure, an idea of great potential in moving towards a more sustainable future. This optimistic design is innovative on multiple scales including great consideration of human experience. In addition to tackling global issues of waste, this project is well-researched and incorporates details that make the building successful in its specific site."



Haley Teske
“The Happy Land” | An Antiquarium for Torre Annunziata
Students: Haley Teske
School: Montana State University
Professors: Bradford Watson and Jaya Mukhopadhyay
Jury statement: "Happy Land is a compelling urban design proposal that brings a different approach to viewing sustainable living within an existing, and historic, urban fabric. The design promotes public access to cultural heritage and fragile sites, while also acknowledging a dense streetscape and urban scale. Through its research of local economy and the impact of resourcing, the embedded ideas successfully demonstrate new methods of incorporating sustainable strategies in atypical project locations."



Viviani Isnata and Maria Ulloa
Shore of a Hundred Islands
Students: Viviani Isnata and Maria Ulloa
School: California College of the Arts (CCA)
Professors: Evan Jones
Jury statement: "Shore of a Hundred Islands presents an imaginative approach towards the growing issue of rising sea levels. It demonstrates a compelling intersection of traditional form and modern function while also giving careful consideration to aquatic ecology. Within strict programmatic and environmental constraints, the design provides solutions to cultivating both community and privacy."



Thomas Valcourt; Karl Greschner; and Phillippe Bernard
Dyads
Students: Thomas Valcourt, Karl Greschner, and Phillippe Bernard
School: Université Laval
Professors: Claude Demers and André Potvin
Jury statement: "Dyads is an illustrative example of successful architectural tectonics, particularly micro-climate and envelope design. Given its programmatic and environmental parameters, the design is a successful reflection of combining known sustainable strategies in order to create a symbiotic building system in tune with its site."



Will Letchinger and Jonathan Wilkinson
Après le Déluge
Students: Will Letchinger and Jonathan Wilkinson
School: Rice University
Professors: John Casbarian
Jury statement: "With an overarching goal of addressing resiliency at a historic preservation site, Après le Déluge is an elegant solution to a multivalence of problems. This project combines an unusual mixture of programs with a need for elevating infrastructure and does so in a way where each initiative is supported by the other. Although this project could seek further development, it is a beautiful solution to a complex issue."



Peter Lazovskis and Thomas Schaperkotter
Coolth Capitalism
Students: Peter Lazovskis and Thomas Schaperkotter
School: Harvard University Graduate School of Design
Faculty University: University of British Columbia
Professors: Matthew Soules
Jury statement: "Coolth Capitalism addresses sustainability through a uniquely economic lens and is a fantastic example of ambiguity in architecture. This quasi-dystopian design explores the idea of how slender towers may evolve over time based on real estate and resource availability. Thoughtful research about carbon sequestering, water usage, and energy consumption prompt consideration of new approaches to sustainability in dense urban environments."



Cynthia Suarez-Harris; Ledell Thomas; and Kennia Lopez
The Fly Flat
Students: Cynthia Suarez-Harris, Ledell Thomas, and Kennia Lopez
School: Prairie View A&M University
Faculty: Shelly Pottorf, Shannon Bryant, and April Ward
Jury statement: "The Fly Flat is a hopeful project which transforms modular design into art. The impeccable renderings explore vernacular housing in an innovative way while creating affordable and sustainable residential design. This proposal demonstrates thorough research and discovery of new concepts in working towards meeting its primary goal of how to address climate change in low-income communities."



Catherine Earley; Elena Koepp; and Sabrina Ortiz
Healing Habitats
Students: Catherine Earley, Elena Koepp, and Sabrina Ortiz
School: University of Oregon
Faculty: Brook Muller
Jury statement: "Healing Habitats proposes a method of wellness where architecture directly engages public health. The design is a great example of how low-tech architecture plays a significant role in sustainability. Comprehensive research in this design incorporates current needs facing the site, such as community and ecology, as well as projective concerns of flooding, drought, water and wastewater."

2019/04/19

Victor Hugo Was Wrong


The author of The Hunchback of Notre Dame believed that the book killed the building as a repository of human thought.



Rudiuk
There’s a particularly strange chapter in Victor Hugo’s strange and wonderful novel, Notre-Dame de Paris (Charles Gosselin Libraire, 1831), titled “This Will Kill That.” In it, the author digresses from the Gothic tale of a gypsy girl and the hunchback who loves her to expound a pet cultural theory: “Le livre tuera l’édifice.” “The book will kill the building.” That simple sentence—subject, verb, object—defines an epochal moment, when the book usurped architecture as humanity’s chief mode of expression. (Hugo put those words in the mouth of a medieval character, the cathedral’s archdeacon, which explains the use of the future tense to refer to an event that occurred in the 15th century.)
“The invention of the printing press is the greatest event in history,” Hugo wrote, and he’s right. (Or, at least, he was right, until the internet came along.) But Hugo is also wrong: The printing press may have taken architecture’s place as the medium of choice, but it didn’t kill architecture, or even mute it. For proof, look no further than the great outpouring of sorrow when Notre Dame was ravaged by fire on April 15. Clearly, that 800-year-old church embodies the spirit of a city, and a nation.
Hugo’s dead-architecture thesis depends on the supposition that buildings are inherently static and singular, whereas books, to their advantage, are transient and numerous: “One can demolish a mass; how can one extirpate ubiquity?” While a building as old as Notre Dame is undeniably singular, it isn’t static. After a century or so, buildings achieve a kind of slow, viscous fluidity, changing on a seemingly geological time scale. Over the course of eight centuries, the cathedral has been expanded, altered, ornamented, pillaged, adapted, restored, and renovated into a physical history of France, written in stone, lead, timber, and glass.
The church that just burned was as much a monument of the 19th-century Gothic Revival, courtesy of enthusiastic restoration architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc, as it was a relic of the 12th-century Gothic. And given the slow pace of medieval construction, one cannot even pin the original to a single phase. A succession of anonymous master builders deployed Early, High, Rayonnant, Flamboyant, and Late iterations of the style.

Memorial service for King Philip V of Spain at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, by Charles-Nicolas Cochin the Younger (1746).
Institut national d’histoire de l’artMemorial service for King Philip V of Spain at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, by Charles-Nicolas Cochin the Younger (1746).
And in-between those Gothic bookends, Louis XIV had Robert de Cotte give the choir a Neoclassical face lift (which Viollet-le-Duc indignantly removed); revolutionaries sacked the place and used it for atheistic pageants; and monarchs from the houses of Bourbon, Bonaparte, and Orléans as well as officials of the various republics staged weddings, coronations, and funerals there—each necessitating elaborate, though not always permanent, reinventions.
French President Emmanuel Macron promises the restoration of Notre Dame Cathedral will be complete in five years, and French billionaires and megacorporations have already pledged more than $700 million toward that goal. Will Notre Dame Cathedral be the same as it was before the fire? No, that is beyond the capacity of the most meticulous preservation efforts. But Notre Dame Cathedral can be as meaningful as it was before the fire. While tragic, the fire creates an opportunity to write a new chapter in the history of the cathedral, the city, and the nation. That story will be written in architecture.

Shining Light on Parabuilding


Distillery in Columbus, Ohio, becomes an award-winning design.

Photo Credit: Brad Feinknopf
Bridging old and new to create something functional and eye-catching with a limited footprint is at the heart of parabuilding.
Parabuilding, a term coined by the late New York Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp, is described by Jonathan Barnes, FAIA, as “an addition or alteration to an existing building that transforms the essential character of the original structure.”
That is exactly what Barnes and his team at Jonathan Barnes Architecture & Design of Columbus, Ohio, did with the expansion of a historic 1920s-era warehouse that is home to an artisan small-batch distillery.
Photo Credit: Brad Feinknopf
A 55-foot tiered structure clad in Kalwall translucent sandwich panels rises from the original warehouse to create a distinct feature that is not just striking, but has been central in allowing Middle West Spirits of Columbus to grow its business.
The design earned an AIA Columbus 2017 Architecture - Honor Award.
In addition to a tasting room, bottle shop, and office, the expansion needed to accommodate new distillery equipment to increase production, including two new towering stills, one 50 feet tall and the other 35 feet tall, as well as several large mashing tanks.
Photo Credit: Brad Feinknopf
Working within a restricted footprint, a center portion of the 10,000-square-foot warehouse’s original steel bow truss and wood roof was removed. Kalwall panels were used to clad the entire new structure, creating what Barnes describes as a monolithic translucent white tower with both a striking and subtle daytime presence and a glowing, beacon-like quality at night. The adjacent tasting room was positioned to have a striking view of the distillery.
In addition to being a distinctive feature, Kalwall translucent sandwich panels provide the owners with a bright space that allows them to easily monitor the equipment within the distillery.
Photo Credit: Brad Feinknopf
Kalwall’s daylight-modeling service also allowed the architects to design the building so that different elevations transmit different amounts of light to provide completely balanced, museum-quality daylighting.
John Kelly, the Ohio sales representative for Kalwall, says both Jonathan Barnes Architecture & Design and Sullivan Builders of Worthington, Ohio, were looking for a single-source cladding solution that was within budget and could meet their timetables. “The decision to clad the building with Kalwall was made after the excavation work had started,” he says. “They learned that they could eliminate quite a bit of the steel behind our panels due to our span capability and the lightweight nature of Kalwall. This was an unexpected cost-savings to the team.”

2019/04/15

The Green Heart | Luca Peralta Studio

                                                                                                 

The Green Heart

The “Green Heart”, designed for all types of users, is accessible in 5 minutes walking from the most important buildings of the Campus. In its most central area, it is designed to be a flexible space that can accommodate varying seasonal activities and events such as summer jet fountains and winter ice skating. Yet, in its periphery, the university “quad” offers three distinct subspaces with varied micro climates. These spaces are varied in scale and design to allow different informal gatherings, from a meditation retreat to an amphitheater for special events. Each subspace is integrated with functional landscape systems that infiltrate and clean rainwater before slowly releasing it into the Laajalahti Nature Preserve.
The Green Heart | Luca Peralta Studio
Courtesy of Luca Peralta Studio
The particular form of the “Green Heart” provides clear and not residual external outdoor spaces adjacent to the surrounding buildings. These result in a large “piazza” between the new intervention and the Main Building of the Campus activated with several commercial activities and restaurants, as well as distinct outdoor spaces adjacent to the School of Science’s Nano Buildings to the North and to the VTT complex toward the South. A fluid and permeable architecture that embrace outdoor public spaces. The different areas required by the program are organized within a single building embracing a public outdoor area accessible 24 hours to all: students, faculty members and simple citizens.
The Green Heart | Luca Peralta Studio
Courtesy of Luca Peralta Studio
As an organizational system the interior spaces can function as one building or as eight attached and highly interconnected ones: 1. The new Metro (at ground floor, South side); 2. The commercial area and the main restaurants (at ground floor); 3. The department of the Dean (1st, 2nd levels, North‐East side); 4. The department of Art (1st, 2nd, 3rd levels, East side); 5. The department of Design (1st, 2nd, 3rd levels, Southside); 6. The department of Architecture and Landscape (1st, 2nd, 3rd levels, South‐West side); 7. The department of Media (1st, 2nd levels, Northside); 8. The department of Media Centre Lume (3rd levels, Northside); Each department is designed as self-sufficient, with the independent flight of stairs, elevators, fire stairs at an appropriate distance, technical shafts, technical spaces underground, toilettes etc. Both the entrances under the arches of the three grand gateways and the entrances placed in the three central atriums can be used by the users of the commercial area/restaurants and by the user of the programs above. This very particular system of entrances, if needed, can adapt to respond to a more selective organization of flow, i.e. more or less department oriented, more or less private/public, more or less 24-hour accessibility etc. The idea of organizing the different departments into one building was driven by the aim of allowing maximum interaction between programs thanks to shared/interconnected spaces, proximities, adjacencies or simply visual connections.
The Green Heart | Luca Peralta Studio
Courtesy of Luca Peralta Studio
The ground level is designed with a generous glazed corridor along the internal skin, which can conveniently be used also as a covered public passage during periods of inclement weather. On the first and second levels, the corridor runs in the middle, as a traditional double-loaded corridor, with smaller rooms/studios towards the internal side and large classrooms/laboratories towards the external one. On the third floor the corridor follows along the internal glazed facade to define large classrooms and laboratories facing the external facade.
The Green Heart | Luca Peralta Studio
Courtesy of Luca Peralta Studio
The spaces above the arches are designed as oblique auditoriums with a dramatic view into the internal grand courtyard and will be shared as lecture halls or study lounges by the different departments. This organizational system of entrances, corridors, vertical relationships and a great variety of spaces, of varying layouts, orientation and sizes, allows for ultimate flexibility in programmatic uses in order to respond and adapt to unpredictable future needs.
The Green Heart | Luca Peralta Studio
Courtesy of Luca Peralta Studio
Project Info
Architects: Luca Peralta Studio
Location: Otaniemi, Finland
Consultant: ARUP
Mechanical Consultant: Riccardo Zara
Structural Consultant: Ambrogio Angotzi
Year: 2012
Type: Educational  
Nguồn ARCH20.com

2019/03/28

ADD건설GROUP 공유 오피스

Cen X ADD Space는  ADD건설GROUP 이 만들어낸  한국인을 위한 하노이의 건설 부동산 개발관련 협업 공간 모델  입니다.

임대문의  영어 : 093 456 8700 






Cen X ADD Space는 "부동산 부문에서 공존 생태계를 완성시키는"공동 작업 공간을 만들기를 희망하며  Cen X ADD Space는 금융,건설,부동산 ,디자인 관련업계 신생 기업 및 비즈니스를 지원합니다. 
이것은 고객이  더욱 신뢰할 수있는 전문 부동산 시스템을 만드는 데  있습니다.

















Đăng ký "x" đăng ký khi có thông tin khởi động m;  Không gian cộng tác tại H & # 224 là duy nhất.  Tủ
Cen X ADD Space에서는 매달 부동산 관련 세미나가 열립니다..


Cen X Space는 고급스럽고 영감을주는 작업 공간을 제공합니다.

고속 Wi-Fi 인터넷 시스템, 프린터, 스캐너, 스포츠 및 엔터테인먼트 게임, 편안한 셀프 서비스 음료, 개인 공간, 점심 공간 등 비즈니스 유틸리티 서비스 외에도 , pool, ... 이것은 업무 효율을 향상시키는 데 도움이됩니다.

Cen X ADD Space와 같은 고급스럽고 자유롭고 영감을주는 작업 공간은 서로에게 시너지 효과를 창출합니다. 이것은 하노이의 독특한 작업 공간 모델입니다.



Thông tin liên hệ: 093.456.8700

2019/03/27

VPA19-P06 PARTRON VINA FACTORY


Site area: 20,000 m2
ADD work scope: Design, Permission and Build.
Year: 2019-2020










Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất

Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất
Kiến trúc sư Liu Guan Hong cho biết, anh đã lấy cảm hứng từ hình ảnh những cây tre mọc trên sườn đồi để làm nên kết cấu vô cùng đặc biệt của ngôi nhà này.
Ông Lin, 54 tuổi sau khi nghỉ hưu đã trở về quê hương là Hsinchu và bắt đầu khảo sát nơi mà ông muốn sẽ thiết lập một cuộc sống chậm rãi hơn, an nhàn hơn trong nửa cuối của cuộc đời.
Cuối cùng, ông đã chọn ngọn đồi ở ngoại ô Tân Trúc rộng khoảng 30.000m2. Ông đã nhờ một người bạn thân của con trai, KTS Guan Hong để cùng ông thiết kế ngôi nhà mơ ước cho cuộc đời mình.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 1.
Ngôi nhà với hình dáng vô cùng đặc biệt.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 2.
Tổng thể ngôi nhà gồm có 4 tòa nhà nối liền nhau.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 3.
Phác thảo không gian khi thiết kế mặt bằng.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 4.
Không gian được xây dựng ở phần sườn đồi thoai thoải.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 5.
Ông Lin đã mất nhiều thời gian cải tạo xung quanh trước khi xây nhà.
Điều đặc biệt đầu tiên, xuyên suốt ai cũng có thể nhìn thấy đó là ngôi nhà không có mái.
Điều đó giúp cuộc sống của mọi người trong nhà thêm gần gũi hơn với thiên nhiên, có thêm nhiều cơ hội ngắm nhìn bầu trời đầy sao, được hóng gió ngay trong từng góc nhỏ của ngôi nhà.
Và bất ngờ hơn, ngôi nhà được giải Huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất ở Đài Loan, đó cũng chính là món quà tuyệt vời dành cho cả chủ nhân của ngôi nhà và KTS.
Anh Liu là một KTS đã từng làm việc tại Beiming Architechts ở New York. Anh trở về Đài Loan vào năm 2009 để thành lập công ty cho riêng mình.
Chủ nhân của ngôi nhà đã bày tỏ rằng, ông muốn quay trở lại những ngọn núi của thiên nhiên, dựng một ngôi nhà, cuộc sống sau khi nghỉ hưu sẽ tương đối nhàn nhã, chăm sóc cây cối và tận hưởng những ngày trong lành, bình yên.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 6.
Căn nhà do KTS trẻ, bạn của con trai ông thực hiện.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 7.
Khung cảnh thật đẹp của đồi núi và tổ ấm hiện đại.
Ngay sau khi tìm được ngọn đồi thoai thoải, ông đã mất vài năm để cải tạo thiên nhiên xung quanh trước khi bắt đầu xây một ngôi nhà đẹp.
Ông muốn kết hợp với thiên nhiên xung quanh để tạo nên một không gian sống xanh, đẹp hiện đại với những vật liệu cơ bản nhất, được bê tông cốt thép nhưng với hình dạng đơn giản.
Ngôi nhà được thiết kế theo bề ngang, chia làm 4 phần giống như biểu tượng của tre mọc trên sườn đồi này.
Phần đầu tiên quay mặt ra bên ngoài thung lũng và thiết kế giật cấp lên phần sườn đồi phía sau. Phần thứ hai nằm phía dưới chân núi.
Đuôi tòa nhà thứ 3 lại được kết nối với núi đồi phía sau. Phần thứ 4 được nâng lên với các không gian độc lập với toàn bộ đồi.
Bốn tòa nhà có chức năng khác nhau, chúng có thể tách biệt độc lập nhưng vẫn có sự kết nối ấn tượng.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 8.
KTS Liu, người thực hiện công trình của ông Lin.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 9.
Không gian khi về đêm.
Tòa nhà đầu tiên là không gian nơi con cháu của ông Lin sở hữu. Ngôi nhà có phần đuôi được thiết kế như cầu trượt dốc đủ để các bé có thể thoải mái vui chơi, bầu bạn.
Và đặc biệt là khi ở bên trong, chúng vẫn thỏa sức ngắm bầu trời, vì sao, mặt trăng, ngọn cây, cành lá…
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 10.
Tòa nhà thứ hai rất gần với bãi đỗ xe ở tầng 1. Khoảng cách giữa hai bậc thang là dành cho khách ở bên ngoài.
Khách có thể ra vào phòng riêng biệt từ bãi đỗ xe, đó cũng là nét đặc biệt tạo nên sự tiện lợi cho ngôi nhà.
Phía cuối của tòa nhà là phòng tắm lớn với giếng trời từ phía sau. Mọi người có thể tận hưởng làn nước trong lành và thoải mái ngắm nhìn khung cảnh thiên nhiên phía sau nhà.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 11.
Mọi góc nhỏ đều có thể ngắm nhìn khung cảnh bên ngoài.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 12.
Không gian bên ngoài xanh tươi cây cỏ.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 13.
Tầng thượng được thiết kế bể bơi nhỏ.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 14.
Lối đi nối liền giữa các tòa nhà.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 15.
Giếng trời với cây xanh ấn tượng.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 16.
Phòng tắm bên trong nhà.
Mái nhà của tòa thứ hai có một không gian vô cùng đặc biệt, khá rộng rãi, xung quanh chủ yếu sử dụng các bức tường kính.
Nơi đây được gọi là phòng sinh hoạt chung, để người thân trong gia đình có thể có cơ hội làm những việc mình thích nhưng vẫn vô cùng ấm áp, sum vầy.
Tòa thứ ba là tòa lớn nhất, rộng nhất và cao nhất. Tòa nhà này được phân chia khá nhiều phòng với các chức năng khác nhau như phòng khách, phòng bếp, phòng ăn, nơi vui chơi cho trẻ em.
Đặc biệt, tòa nhà này còn được thiết kế hầm rượu trải dài trên núi để ông Lun có thể tạo nên những chai rượu vang thật chất lượng.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 17.
Không gian chủ yếu sử dụng chất liệu kính.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 18.
Có cầu thang nối liền tầng hầm lên tòa nhà của ông Lin.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 19.
Không gian sinh hoạt chung của gia đình.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 20.
Phòng ngủ đơn giản, ấm cúng.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 21.
Góc nhỏ đủ để tất cả mọi người được làm những việc mình thích trong cùng một căn phòng.
Tòa cuối cùng được thiết kế khá yên tĩnh, riêng tư với phòng ngủ, phòng tắm và phòng tập thể dục của ông Lin.
Từ nhà xe phía dưới hầm cũng có lối đi bí mật, riêng biệt để ông Lin có thể nhanh chóng đi từ hầm lên không gian riêng của mình. Lối đi này cũng khá riêng tư và ông luôn có chìa khóa để chỉ mình mới có thể sử dụng.
Mỗi không gian đều được thiết kế đơn giản, đẹp hiện đại và ngập tràn ánh sáng.
Để tối đa hóa việc tận hưởng cuộc sống gần gũi với thiên nhiên, ông Lin đã nhờ KTS ưu ái việc sử dụng những bức tường bằng thủy tinh.
Đồng thời, ông chọn kính chắn nắng để có thể ngăn chặn tia UV, đồng thời hạn chế được việc mọi người có thể nhìn được các khu vực bên trong khi đứng ở bên ngoài.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 22.
Các bé thích thú với bể bơi trên tầng thượng.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 23.
Tự do vui chơi với mái kính.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 24.
Bậc thang từ tầng hầm lên tòa thứ 4.
Đặc biệt hơn, xuyên suốt ngôi nhà là con đường dạo bộ nối liền giúp mọi người có thể không cần xuống sân, vòng quanh vườn vẫn có thể đến được các căn phòng trong cùng hệ thống.
Những không gian nhiều nắng cũng có mành che di động giúp mọi người dễ dàng điều chỉnh ánh sáng khi cần thiết.
 Ngôi nhà độc đáo không có mái giành huy chương vàng trong cuộc thi thiết kế nội thất - Ảnh 25.
Mành che điều tiết ánh sáng.
Nếu nhìn từ bên ngoài, mọi người sẽ không nhìn thấy có quá nhiều điểm đặc biệt của ngôi nhà. Tuy nhiên khi khám phá sẽ đi từ bất ngờ này đến bất ngờ khác. Hiện tại, cuộc sống của ông Lin vô cùng thảnh thơi.
Ông bắt đầu với những thú vui chăm cây, trồng cây, đi bộ tận hưởng thiên nhiên trong lành. Ông còn dành phần lớn thời gian để học thêm nhạc cụ, làm giàu đời sống tinh thần. Mỗi ngày là một khoảnh khắc an yên, tự tại.

                                                                                                Nguồn : Nhật Anh
                                                                                                               Helino